Snapshots of life and crafts on our little homestead

Archive for the ‘Canning’ Category

Mango salsa

Canning season has officially started in my household. This past week corn, kale, snow peas, and fruit cocktail have been canned and shelved for the winter months. Today I canned a lovey peach and mango salsa that turned out so well that I wanted to share the recipe with all of you.

The recipe makes about 11 half-pints so adjust the ingredients according to your needs.

  • 6 cups seeded, peeled and diced peaches (~4 large fruits)
  • 6 cups peeled, seeded and diced, firm ripe mangos
  • 2 cups diced orange or yellow bell peper
  • 1 1/2 cups finely diced red onion
  • 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 4 diced fresh jalapeños
  • Juice and zest of a fresh lime
  • 1 1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  1. Sterilize canning jars and tops.
  2. place all the ingredients in a large pot and bring to a boil stirring until the sugar is dissolved.
  3. reduce to a simmer and cook for an additional 5 minutes.
  4. scoop the salsa into hot jars leaving 1/2 inch head space.
  5. wipe the top of the jars and screw the lids on.
  6. process in a water bath for 20 minutes.

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Bottles of sunshine

It was time for the final filtering and bottling of peach, pear and apple vinegars started last harvest season. I still have another gallon of apple cider vinegar to filter and bottle, but I would like the mother in the jar to get a bit larger before disturbing the contents. The nice thing about the vinegars is that they are organic and created from fruit from our trees or the orchard at the bottom of the hill. 

Earlier this week I also started lemon and orange extract as well as a citrus liqueur for next summer.  I find that extracts are some of the simplest things to make. All you need is some rinds, seeds or pods, an inexpensive vodka, and time to make luscious extracts.

Citrus extracts

Now to feed the sourdough starter and have a nice cup of coffee.

Have a great day…

Small batch canning

It is just about the end of our vegetable gardens for this year, which allows for some small batch processing of special treats. Today I made apple chips, pickled jalapeños and a few jars of spicy green tomatoes.

Later today I will be pulling out the last of the kale and dehydrating it for the winter.

Preparing for the cold months to come

Harvest season is in full force on our homestead so there is little time to do anything other than can and dehydrate the bounty. After a couple of weeks of picking and processing the fruits and vegetables from the garden we were able to escape for a long weekend with friends to a lakefront cabin for a bit of kayaking and a lot of talking. We returned home to a lot of ripe produce, especially tomatoes that needed to be picked and processed.

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Pickled hot peppers, green beans and pasta sauce canned from yesterday’s harvest

Today I prepared and canned green beans, eggplant and tomato pasta sauce, pickled hot peppers, and also filled the dehydrator with tomato slices and skins that were processed into tomato powder and stored as slices for winter dishes.

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Dehydrated tomato slices, 1/4 inch pieces dried down to these thin wafers. They make a great snack if the slices are sprinkled with an herb salt prior to being dehydrated.

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We try to not waste anything in our kitchen. These dehydrated skins will be ground and added to the tomato powder.

I also dehydrated some almond pulp leftover from almond milk we made, and started a batch of goat cheese (goat milk was from a farm near the camp).

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Dried almond pulp that will be ground into flour

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Ground almond flour ready to be used in baked goods

It is alsotime to start working on vinegars for dressings and marinades. This season I am making chive, wild violet, peach, pear and apple vinegars. The fruit vinegars are a great way to use up skins and other bits that are left over from canning projects.

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Dehydrated tomato slices, peach vinegar on its second ferment, apple cider vinegar on the first ferment, and tomato powderthat is used as a replacement for tomato paste

 

Now it is time to clean the kitchen and kick back for a while.

Hope you all have had a productive day.

Summer kitchen

It is currently the point in the growing season where I spend a large portion of my time in the kitchen. This morning I filled the dehydrator with some of the items picked from our gardens last night (they will be used in soups and stews), started some pasta sauce in the crockpot (will can it in pint containers tomorrow), made some eggplant meatless balls for the freezer, made a peach crumble (oven was already on so why not), and started a batch of peach scraps fermenting  for salad dressings and marinades.

What has your day been like?

 

Fresh batch of aubergine pasta sauce

With the very warm wet summer this year we have a bumper crop of green beans, tomatoes and eggplant. This morning I used 12 pounds of our tomatoes and 4 pounds of eggplant to make some lovely jars of aubergine pasta sauce.

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The recipe I use is as follows. Please keep in mind that the canning method is the one that I use in my house. Please follow the canning method and times that are appropriate for your household.

INGREDIENTS

    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 1 large onion , chopped
    • 6 garlic cloves , chopped
    • 1 large bell pepper , chopped
    • 2 lbs eggplants, cubed
    • 8 cups tomatoes , peeled & cubed
    • 1/4 cup tomato powder or 1-6 ounce can of tomato paste
    • 4 tablespoons fresh basil
    • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    • 2 teaspoons dry oregano
    • 1/3 cup date sugar (can substitute brown sugar)
    • 2 teaspoons sea salt 
    • 1 teaspoon pepper
    • 1 cup dry red wine

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a large pot, heat olive oil over medium heat.
  2. Add onion and garlic; cook until the onion is soft.
  3. Add tomatoes, eggplant, bell pepper, tomato paste, basil, oregano, hot pepper flakes, sugar, salt, pepper, and wine; stir.
  4. Bring to boil; reduce heat, cover and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Blend mixture with an emersion blender. 
  6. Put into hot jars and add prepared lids and rings. Screw rings on until finger tight.
  7. Process in hot water bath for 40 minutes.

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No matter how much canning I do, the reduction in volume when fresh produce is processed always amazes me. 

preparing for the colder months

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It was time to thin the kale this morning. The cutting rendered 8 pints of greens and a half gallon container chopped stems for fermenting.

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While waiting on the pressure canner I blanched yesterday’s green bean harvest and placed them in the dehydrator for drying. We really prefer to use dehydrated green beans rather than frozen in winter soups and stews. For the next month or so our dehydrator, pressure cooker and water bath canner will be running almost daily.

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Making Vegetable Broth

Our gardens are starting to produce fairly well so I have been doing a lot of canning and dehydrating of vegetables, which has also produces a lot veggie scraps. By the end of this weekend I had enough to fill a large crockpot and make a batch of vegitable broth this afternoon.

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I find that making my own vegitable broth saves us a fair amount of money and taste better than any brand I have found in the market. To make your own broth fill a slow cooker with vegitable scraps. For this batch I used onion, mushroom stems,  celery, tomatoes, beets, kale stems, broccoli, cabbage, carrot tops, and green bean tips (keep in mind that you can always store scraps in the freezer until you have enough to make a batch of broth). Cover the scraps with water until it is about an inch above the scraps, add salt, pepper and herbs to the pot and cook on low for about 10-12 hours.

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Run the cooked scrap mixture through press to render as much liquid as possible and then pour through a fine mesh seive to remove the larger vegitable particles that made it through the press.

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Place the pressed scraps in to your compost container.

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Pour the the warm broth into prepared canning jars and pressure cook for 75 minutes at the pressure recommended for pressure in your area.

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Blueberry season has started

Thanks to a nice neighbor who lets us pick blueberries in their orchard, I was able to process 18 jars of berries in a very light syrup for snacking fall through spring. I just love the pinging sound the lids make when they seal.

The next picking of berries will be mixed with our raspberries and turned into juice. 

Time for ferments

It is time to start  vegetable fermentation today. Each year a portion of our veritable are set aside to be fermented. This process provides very healthy products that require little or not refrigeration.
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I wanted to try a different flavor profile for sauerkraut so a small batch taster was started. If we like the flavor I will start a large stone crock of the flavored sauerkraut, if not we will make a large batch of a more traditional flavor. A jar of spicy green beans was also started. It is to bad that we have to wait three months to dig into those lovely green gems.

Tomorrow I will start carrots and korhabi fermenting. What type of vegetables do you ferment?

Time to can the cherries

To welcome in cherry season I spent the morning preparing and canning a dozen pint sized jars of cherries in light syrup for cold washer treats. Should have been able to can more, but many of the lovely sweets got eaten during the process.

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Homemade lemon curd

Now that the days are longer our birds have been providing us with a large quantity of eggs. Some have been sold, dozens are frozen for the fall when the birds molt, and a number have been used in various baked goods. Today I used  a dozen of the duck eggs to make a batch of lemon curd for cakes and toast in the winter months. We will really enjoy this liquid sunshine during the cold months…

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December SAL update

The holiday break provided me with an opportunity to finish up a few gifts and make a nice amount of progress on the Linen and Threads 2017  SAL. Finished February, March and April this month.

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Gathering season

Gathering season has started. The dehydrator is running almost daily and canning will start next week. This year between the mild winter and drought this summer, we have more wild life than I care for during growing season. The deer ate most of the low hang fruit and nuts, a variety of creatures finished off the hazelnuts, pears, carrots, and beets before they were ready to pick. The birds fought us for cherries and blueberries. We really don’t mind feeding wildlife, but we wish that they would share.

Although we lost a fair amount of fruit and nuts this season, the vegetables out did themselves. We have had several harvest of kale, summer squash, eggplant, tomatoes, green beans, kidney beans, cucumbers and herbs. The pie pumpkins came in early and large, and potatoes came in on schedule. Both are sitting in the utility room seasoning before being moved to winter storage.

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For the past week the dehydrator has been working overtime to process various vegetables and herbs for winter soups and stews.

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Yesterday I processed a large batch of kale into a dried powder for use in smoothies and soups.

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A few of the kale stems were also given to the dogs as treats…for some reason our dogs love veggies.

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Apples are also starting to mature, so the first batch of apple cider vinegar has been started in the crock.

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Do you grow your own produce? If so, how are your gardens doing and how do you process the harvest?

Peach Salsa

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I just love having a large batch of fresh, colorful vegetables to work with. Fortunately, peaches are in and the vegetable gardens are producing well, so this morning I made and canned a batch of peach salsa.

Fruit salsa is so popular in my house that this is the second batch that I have made in the last week (all will be gone by next spring).  I hope you enjoy the recipe as much as we do.

Peach Salsa

peach salsa

Ingredients

  • 9 cups fresh peaches, mangoes, or a combination of both, peeled and chopped
  • 2 Tbsp lemon or lime juice (fresh or bottled)
  • 4 cups fresh tomatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 2 large sweet peppers, diced
  • 2 cups onions, diced
  • 2 Tbsp dried jalapeno flakes (or fresh hot peppers if you wish. Add more or less to your desired heat level)
  • 1/4 cup cilantro or parsley, chopped
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 T honey
  • 2 T clear gel to thicken

Directions

  1. Mix peaches with lime or lemon juice.
  2. Combine all ingredients in large pot.
  3. Bring to boil over medium heat and cook for five or six minutes.
  4. Remove from heat.
  5. Ladle into prepared canning jars.
  6. Screw on lids and process in boiling water canner for 10 minutes.

canned peach salsa

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